Advanced Part II Workshop

Our advanced Part II workshop will provides a review and extension of the comprehensive one-day workshop, provides a question and answer forum on all aspects of language arts and instructs how to teach advanced phonemic concepts playfully and brain efficiently.

This workshop is recommended for anyone who has completed a comprehensive one-day Zoo-phonics® workshop.

Our target audience includes teachers, administrators and parents of Preschool, Head Start, Kindergarten, 1st-3rd Grades, Title I, Title VII, Special Education, ELL/Bilingual, and tutors or instructional aides.

A Part II training reviews and extends your one-day training…

  • Provides a question and answer forum on all aspects of language arts.
  • Instructs you how to teach advanced phonemic concepts playfully and brain efficiently, for example: 1) long vowels that stand alone in the syllable or word (me, go, remember); 2) “e” on the end of the word that gives the vowel its long sound (made, kite, hole); 3) two-vowel phonemes (rain, read, pie) and diphthongs (toy, boil, buoyant); 4) silent letters (gnome, comb, write); 5. soft sounds (cent, gentle, cyclone).
  • Gives you of practice with the phonetic concepts found above, tying them directly into reading, spelling, writing and literature.
  • Discusses how and when to edit student writing and how to maximize student performance and creativity in the reading and writing domains.
  • Helps teachers and administrators to develop a continuity in the reading and writing curriculum throughout the grades.
  • Discusses the importance of assessments and shows you how to be a diagnostic and prescriptive teacher.
  • Actively involves participants in all aspects of the Zoo-phonics® Multisensory Language Arts Program, including how to use the Zoo-phonics® Readers, Sound Flash Cards, games and other support materials, tying them into the classroom curriculum.

We also offer “Make and Take” workshops! Please contact Charmaine Turpin at 800.622.8104 or e-mail charmaine@zoo-phonics.com for details.

workshop schedule

Your use of picture mnemonics to teach letter-sound relations is indeed supported by findings of our 1983 study published in the Journal of Educational Psychology

Your use of picture mnemonics to teach letter-sound relations is indeed supported by findings of our 1983 study published in the Journal of Educational Psychology. In this study we found in two experiments that beginning readers learned letter-sound relations more effectively when they were taught associations between objects having shapes that resembled the shapes of the letters and having names that began with the sound to be associated with the letters. You have applied this principal to all of your letters. In addition you have included body movements that relate to the objects. The evidence suggests that this should help children learn these associations more effectively. Help in learning letter-sound associations is particularly important for children who come to school without much knowledge about letter shapes, names and sounds and for children who have a difficult time remembering associations by rote. In addition, building letter instruction around animals and body movements make learning more fun.

Professor Linnea C. Ehri Program in Educational Psychology March 10, 2016