Comprehensive One-Day Workshop

Our comprehensive one-day workshop will enable you to quickly and effectively teach all aspects of language arts – based on phonemic awareness and phonics, taught kinesthetically and mnemonically. The principle of Zoo-phonics® maximizes understanding, memory, utilization and transference to all areas of the reading, spelling and writing process in a playful and concrete manner.

This workshop is recommended for anyone who wants to learn Zoo-phonics® to teach to others. Zoo-phonics® is easy to learn. A Zoo-phonic workshop will train you to implement Zoo-phonics® effectively and see quick results!

Our target audience includes teachers, administrators and parents of Preschool, Head Start, Kindergarten, 1st-3rd Grades, Title I, Title VII, Special Education, ELL/Bilingual, and tutors or instructional aides.

A comprehensive one-day workshop

  • Teaches the Animal Alphabet that “cements” sounds and shapes of the alphabet into memory through a Body Movement, allowing the children to utilize the alphabet immediately. Sequentially and developmentally teaches through the educational hierarchy: listening, speaking, reading and writing.
  • Presents many playful phonemic awareness activities.
  • Introduces many ideas to help you teach phonics, sound blending, reading, spelling, writing and critical thinking skills through use of both decodable books and literature.
  • Emphasizes the alphabet, VC/CVC words, blends, digraphs and the schwa sound. A short introduction to the more advanced phonemic concepts (long vowels, diphthongs, silent letters and soft sounds) is included.
  • Demonstrates how to reach all of your students (special needs, ELL, gifted, etc.).

Workshop Schedule

Your use of picture mnemonics to teach letter-sound relations is indeed supported by findings of our 1983 study published in the Journal of Educational Psychology

Your use of picture mnemonics to teach letter-sound relations is indeed supported by findings of our 1983 study published in the Journal of Educational Psychology. In this study we found in two experiments that beginning readers learned letter-sound relations more effectively when they were taught associations between objects having shapes that resembled the shapes of the letters and having names that began with the sound to be associated with the letters. You have applied this principal to all of your letters. In addition you have included body movements that relate to the objects. The evidence suggests that this should help children learn these associations more effectively. Help in learning letter-sound associations is particularly important for children who come to school without much knowledge about letter shapes, names and sounds and for children who have a difficult time remembering associations by rote. In addition, building letter instruction around animals and body movements make learning more fun.

Professor Linnea C. Ehri Program in Educational Psychology March 10, 2016